Friday, February 20, 2015

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Fingerprints of Creation - Dr Robert Gentry

  • Friday, February 20, 2015
  • Samuel Kadyakale

  • Dr Robert Gentry a Geologist presents evidence from Granite that flies in the face of present scientific beliefs that the universe evolved and was not created. It details the nature of polonium halos and how they provide evidence that the Earth was rapidly formed and did not cool over millions of years. The video, shot mostly in California takes the viewer to picturesque Yosemite National Park during the winter and the regions surrounding Palm Springs and Bishop where granites are plainly visible. Three-dimensional graphic animations are included to help convey the process of halo formation from nuclear particles. Instrumentation similar to that used to gather the published data on the polonium halos is shown along with simple demonstrations which illustrate the basic concepts of a short-lived nuclear emitter. Dr. Gentry explains the history of the origin of granite and scientists' attempts to arrive at a universally accepted model of its formation. Ordering Info.



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    Saturday, January 28, 2012

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    Is Islam in Bible Prophecy? - Dr Dwight Nelson

  • Saturday, January 28, 2012
  • Samuel Kadyakale
  • In the following videos Dr Dwight Nelson of Pioneer Memorial Church tackles the question, Is Islam in Bible Prophecy. He goes to among other Bible books, the book of Revelation to explain the origins of Islam. He goes further to show how God has used the sons of Ishmael in the Bible to preserve the truths of the bible and to preserve God's people. He gives among others the time when Joseph's brothers wanted to kill him but ended up selling him to the Ishmaelites who eventually sold him to the Egyptians. Through this intervention God saved his people from famine when they were allowed to settle in Egypt where Joseph had become a Senior official in Pharaoh's household. In history he mentions the case of the Turks whose attacks diverted the attention of King Charles ensuring that the Protestantism would take root and when King Charles returned from fighting the moslem Turks he could not extinguish the fire of protestantism as it had grown a lot during the intervening period. One historian actually says, 'they would not be a protestant had it not been for the Turk'. You will hear all about this in the videos that follow.

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    Saturday, January 21, 2012

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    Is Islam in Apocalyptic history - Dr Dwight Nelson

  • Saturday, January 21, 2012
  • Samuel Kadyakale
  • In a series entitled,"The Star Is Still Rising Over Islam", Dr Dwight Nelson or Pioneer Memorial Church at Andrews University in the US. preaches on this controversial topic on the part Islam will play in the end of the world. Has God used Islam just as he has used Catholics, baptists etc or is He still using Islam in spreading his will on the earth. Could it be that God had a hand in the rise of this monotheistic religion? Before you answer this question remember that God promised to be with the children of Ishmael until the end of the world. Is He still keeping his promise over the Arabs who are the children of Ishmael?

    Does God still has His people among Moslems even in the midst of the violence by a fanatical minority within it? In answering this question remember the violence perpetrated in the name of Christianity through the Crusades, David Koresh, Rev Jim Jones, Northern Ireland violence between Catholics and Protestants. Do these incidences prove that Christianity promotes violence. Not all. For God is love and that love is fully expressed through Christ's life and death on the earth. The Christ who said turn the other cheek

    We all have biases and may be biased against Islam but I ask you to watch the video with an open mind. My point is, let us converse with our Moslem brothers and sisters as fellow believers in one God (Allah) and may God help us to lead them to a fuller understanding of Issa (Jesus) who the Koran says is coming again.

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    Tuesday, January 17, 2012

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    Quotable Quotes on Christianity

  • Tuesday, January 17, 2012
  • Samuel Kadyakale

  • "History's greatest revolution began, not under a red star in Petrogad in 1917, but under the star of Bethlehem 2000 years ago in the cradle where God invaded history.

    "Men begin revolutions with riots and gunfire. God began His revolution by singling out Mary, a simple country girl,and by telling her that the Holy Spirit would cause the very Son of God to be born to her. Mary consented, and the revolution began. That's how God always starts revolutions: by quietly in­vading ordinary lives that are open to Him."— Christianity Today 4/12/70.
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    Sunday, October 16, 2011

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    Barry Black - How Then Shall We Live

  • Sunday, October 16, 2011
  • Samuel Kadyakale
  • In the following video US senate chaplain Barry C Black preaches on the title How Then Shall We Live. He preached this sermon at a camp meeting in Bermuda.

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    Saturday, October 1, 2011

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    Barry Black - Staying Power sermon excerpt

  • Saturday, October 1, 2011
  • Samuel Kadyakale
  • This is a video excerpt of a sermon delivered at the 1985 Oakwood College Graduation baccalaureate, US Senate Chaplain Barry Black challenges the graduates to learn to have staying power as they go out into the world. At one point in the excerpt he says, 'you must learn to love the difficult'.

    It is one of the most memorable sermons I have ever heard and I hope you too will be inspired by this sermon. Barry C Black, an African American has achieved many first in the history of America. He was the first African American US Navy Chief of Chaplains and he is currently the first African American US Senate Chaplain. He has recently written an autobiography entitled From the Hood to the Hill: A Story of Overcoming. It chronicles his journey from the hood to his rise to be the first African American US Senate Chaplain.

    The quality of the picture int the video below is not great but I could not resist sharing this powerful excerpt from someone who has learned to live through adversity and yet achieved a lot.

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    Saturday, September 10, 2011

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    Charles E Bradford - Buy That Field

  • Saturday, September 10, 2011
  • Samuel Kadyakale
  • In the following video Pastor Charles E Bradford preaches on the topic,'Buy That Field'. It is from Brayton SDA Church.

    Pastor Charles E. Bradford - Buy That Field from Brayton SDA Church on Vimeo.

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    Friday, September 9, 2011

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    Take 6 - Hark The Herald Angels Sing

  • Friday, September 9, 2011
  • Samuel Kadyakale
  • The following video is a beatiful rendition of 'Hark The Herald Angels Sing' by Take 6 of the US. Take 6 was born on the campus of Oakwood College in Huntsville, Alabama. They have to their credit 10 grammy awards and have rubbed shoulders with some of the most famous American singers. Above all they have loved shoulders with the Mornach of the galaxes, who matters more than any relationships we might have. Enjoy the beautiful rendition.

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    Tuesday, September 6, 2011

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    Principles of Good Christian Music - Ivor Myers

  • Tuesday, September 6, 2011
  • Samuel Kadyakale
  • Ivor Myers talks about the way the devil is using music to control the minds of people including christians.

    Sonic Warfare - Ivor Myers from WeimarTV on Vimeo.

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    Sunday, September 4, 2011

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    What Jesus said about Justification

  • Sunday, September 4, 2011
  • Samuel Kadyakale

  • Written by Morris Venden


    And he spake this parable unto certain which trusted in themselves that they were righteous, and despised others: two men went up into the temple to pray; the one a Pharisee, and the other a publican. The Pharisee stood and prayed thus with himself, God, I thank thee, that I am not as other men are, extortioners, unjust, adulterers, or even as this publican. I fast twice in the week, I give tithes of all that I possess. And the publican, standing afar off, would not lift up so much as his eyes unto heaven, but smote upon his breast, saying, God be merciful to me a sinner. I tell you, this man went down to his house justified rather than the other: for every one that exalteth himself shall be abased; and he that humbleth himself shall be exalted" (Luke 18:9-14).
    Two men went to the Temple to pray. One man prayed to himself, the other prayed to God. One man worshiped himself; the other worshiped God. One trusted to his own merits; the other to the mercy of God.
    The Pharisee felt that his own works, his tithe paying, his fasting, his spotless behavior, was sufficient to earn his salvation. Depending upon works for salvation is the distinguishing mark of a legalistic Pharisee. But Jesus said, "Except your righteousness shall exceed the righteousness of the scribes and Pharisees, ye shall in no case enter into the kingdom of heaven" (Matt. 5:20). "I am not come to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance" (chap. 9:13). Justification is mankind being put right with God because of what Jesus has done (seeRom. 3:24). It is a provision in heaven for the redemption of the whole human race, and has as its foundation the spotless righteousness of Jesus. It is not something we can secure by our own efforts. It is a gift. The Pharisee has no advantage over the publican.
    When Jesus cleansed the Temple, He rebuked the religious leaders of His day for making His Father's house a marketplace. Consider for a moment what a marketplace is. It is a place where things are bought and sold. It is a place where one presents the fruits of his own labors to purchase that which he desires. It is a place of exchange. God's house is not a marketplace, for salvation can never be bartered. It is to be freely given, and freely accepted. Salvation is totally a gift. Jesus said it in the words "This is my body which is given for you" (Luke 22:19). It is the ones who cannot pay who are invited to the gospel feast (see chap. 14:14).
    We also notice in the study of Jesus' life that for the person who tries to save himself, there is an inevitable result he forsakes Jesus. This result is found in the story of Peter, who took out his sword and tried to save himself and the rest of the disciples (see Matt. 26:51-56). The very next thing that happened was that Peter and the other disciples all forsook Him and fled. Jesus was left alone with the mob. This is the inevitable result for anyone who tries to save himself. In the end, he will leave Jesus.
    The publican recognized that there was nothing he could do to earn or merit God's mercy. He did not attempt to add anything to the salvation provided. He realized his totally helpless condition. He stood afar off, under conviction, not daring to lift even his eyes unto heaven. Yet he must have seen something of the love of God, in addition to the enormity of his own sin, or he would never have dared to show up in the Temple. And because of his hope of pardon, he came to seek reconciliation with God.
    The publican admitted to being a sinner. Some translations read that he said, "God, be merciful to me the sinner." He felt that he was the worst man in the world. But do you suppose that he really was? Is it necessary to have topped Hitler's record of murders, or to have been more treacherous than Judas, in order to pray the prayer of the publican? Paul prayed it he who had been a Pharisee of the Pharisees. He was willing to say, I am the chief of sinners. It is perhaps possible in Christian circles to vie with one another in claims of wretchedness. There are people who don't feel righteous unless they feel sinful! It is possible to have a form of legalism that takes comfort and assurance in penitence, instead of in Jesus Christ. There have been those who, upon seeing that being a "worm" was somehow noteworthy, could not rest until they had tried to prove that of all worms, they were wormiest. But notice that the publican does not say, "God, be merciful to me because of my penitence." He said, "God be merciful to me a sinner." He was penitent—no question about that. But he didn't make his salvation dependent upon his penitence.
    And the publican was accepted. He went down to his house justified. Acceptance is the key word in the entire beautiful theme of justification. Jesus always accepted those who came to Him. We are accepted just as we are—in fact, that is the only way we can come. We cannot change ourselves in order to come. This is true every day, not only at the beginning of the Christian life. Jesus always accepts us just as we are. He said it in John 6:37: "Him that cometh to me I will in no wise cast out." He said it in John 12:47: "I came not to judge the world, but to save the world." He said in John 8:11 to the woman they dragged into His presence: "Neither do I condemn thee." Even the Jewish leaders recognized this truth, although they didn't appreciate it, when they said, "This man receiveth sinners" (Luke 15:2). Jesus said it in John 5:24: "Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that heareth my word, and believeth on him that sent me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from death unto life."
    Isn't it good news to know that we don't have to fear the judgment? This acceptance of Jesus is full and free, based on His sacrifice in our behalf. It is good for every person who accepts it, and it is good for every day. The poor publican, who cannot even dare to lift up his eyes to heaven, who stands afar off, but who cries out to God for mercy, is able to return to his house holding his head high because he realizes his worth in the eyes of the universe. He can hold his head high because he realizes what God has done for him through Jesus Christ, for when God forgives us, we stand before Him just as though we had never even sinned. "He [Jesus] died for us, and now He offers to take our sins and give us His righteousness. If you give yourself to Him, and accept Him as your Saviour, then, sinful as your life may have been, for His sake you are accounted righteous. Christ's character stands in the place of your character, and you are accepted before God just as if you had not sinned."—Steps to Christ, p. 62.
    The publican was justified when he accepted God's mercy. Justification is no good for any sinner until it is accepted by that sinner (see John 1:12). The Bible does not teach that justification is by grace alone. It is always by grace through faith (see Eph. 2:8). Faith is essential on the part of the sinner (see Heb. 11:6). Faith immediately involves two parties, one trusting the other. When the sinner trusts Jesus for salvation, there comes into existence a saving relationship, which is a subjective experience based on an objective fact. God's forgiveness must be accepted in order to benefit us personally. And we must continue to accept His forgiveness if we would continue to know His justifying grace.
    Notice in four texts what Jesus said about forgiveness, and how it is connected to our relationship with God. The first is found in Matthew 18:2122. "Then came Peter to him, and said, Lord, how oft shall my brother sin against me, and I forgive him? till seven times? Jesus saith unto him, I say not unto thee, Until seven times: but, Until seventy times seven." Of course, Jesus wasn't here setting the limit for forgiveness at 490 times, but He was teaching that we are to forgive our brother as long as he keeps asking unlimited forgiveness.
    In the second text, Luke 17:3-5, we see an even deeper application: "Take heed to yourselves: If thy brother trespass against thee, rebuke him; and if he repent, forgive him. And if he trespass against thee seven times in a day, and seven times in a day turn again to thee, saying, I repent; thou shalt forgive him. And the apostles said unto the Lord, Increase our faith."
    Is this advice limited to human relation ships? Of course not! God would not ask us to do among ourselves more than He would do. This is God's forgiveness. This is the kind of forgiveness that God gives to us. His forgiveness is unlimited. As often as we turn again to Him, admitting our need of His mercy and forgiveness, He gives it to us freely.
    Here is where some people get nervous about the theme of justification. They think that a forgiveness like that will lead people to play fast and loose with God's grace. They think that such a forgiveness will lead to license. But let's notice the third text, Luke 7:40-43: "And Jesus answering said unto him, Simon, I have somewhat to say unto thee. And he saith, Master, say on. There was a certain creditor which had two debtors: the one owed five hundred pence, and the other fifty. And when they had nothing to pay, he frankly forgave them both. Tell me therefore, which of them will love him most? Simon answered and said, I suppose that he, to whom he forgave most. And he said unto him, Thou hast rightly judged."
    Jesus said in Luke 17:3-5 that forgiveness is unending. He said that His Father forgives anyone who comes to Him, and who keeps coming. Does this lead to license? No, because in Luke 7:40-43 the Saviour says that the more one is forgiven, the more he loves.
    The last of the four texts is John 14:15: "'If you love me, you will obey my commandments' " (T.E. V.). * So when we understand God's forgiveness aright, it leads us to a response of love. And love leads to obedience. It's just that simple.
    How long do we need the forgiveness of God? Don't fall into the trap of thinking that justification is only for the beginning of our Christian life. We need God's justifying grace every day. We need His justifying grace because of our past track records. Whether we ever sin again or not, we still need the blood of Jesus to cover our sinful past. We need His justifying grace because we are sinful by nature, and will be until Jesus comes again. And we need His justifying grace every time we fall or fail. It was sin that brought about alienation from God and man in the beginning. And it is only the sacrifice of Jesus, accepted day by day, that is sufficient to heal the broken relationship between God and man, thus making communion between God and man possible.
    As we accept His justification, as we accept Him, we have certainty and assurance concerning our eternal destiny. Eternal life isn't something that we are going to have later on we have it already! "He that believeth on the Son hath everlasting life" (chap. 3:36). "He that heareth my word, and believeth on him that sent me, hath everlasting life" (chap. 5:24). "Verily, verily, I say unto you, he that believeth on me hath everlasting life" (chap. 6:47). "But these are written, that ye might believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God; and that believing ye might have life through his name" (chap. 20:31). "Rejoice, because your names are written in heaven" (Luke 10:20).
    This seems to many of us truth almost too good to be accepted. But it's still the truth Jesus said it! "Put away the suspicion that God's promises are not meant for you. They are for every repentant transgressor. Strength and grace have been provided through Christ to be brought by ministering angels to every believing soul. None are so sinful that they cannot find strength, purity, and righteousness in Jesus, who died for them. He is waiting to strip them of their garments stained and polluted with sin, and to put on them the white robe of His righteousness; He bids them live and not die." —Steps to Christ, pp. 52, 53.
    God's forgiveness was good for the publican back then, and it's still good for every person today. "God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved" (John 3:17).
    * Texts credited to T.E.V. are from the Good News Bible Old Testament: Copyright American Bible Society 1976; New Testament: Copyright American Bible Society 1966, 1971, 1976.
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